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DAVID GUETTA FEBRUARY 2012 CHART

Вышл на Битпорте очередной "мега" релиз от Девида Гуетты ...видно парень не заморачивался по мне так за 20 минут он его скомпелировал) Нет слов!

http://www.beatport.com/chart/david-guetta-february-2012-chart/47976 

 - David Guetta February 2012 Chart
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29 February 2012 10:38
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Top 10 March 2012 Festivals

Top 10 March 2012 Festivals

RA's countdown of the world's best festivals returns for 2012. 

And so it begins. The unofficial start of the festival season is triggered this month by the mass gathering of techno talent that is Timewarp, and the week-long marathon offered by Winter Music Conference. Leading up to these there'll be chances to party in the French Alps, roll around Australian fields or club-hop in Amsterdam. Wherever or whenever you chose to get things going, welcome back.




Jetzt Musik Festival

10. Jetzt Musik Festival
March 21 - March 31
Various Venues 
Mannheim, Germany


Jetzt Musik, the week-long warm-up festival to Time Warp, will again look to provide an array of challenging (and reasonably priced) creative performances in 2012. Held across a range of venues as diverse as the shows themselves, Jetzt Music explores the possibilities of electronic music outside of the nightclub. There's a radio play offered up by Move D and author Thomas Meinecke, while the National Theatre Mannheim will stage improvised ballet to the house sounds of the Highgrade Disharmonic Orchestra, with label members playing off five synchronized laptops. And if that isn't enough, Stefan Goldmann will provide real-time manipulation of classical masterpieces played by the casalQuartett live on-stage. 

RA pick: CLR hit the Loft Club on the final night with Chris Liebing preparing you for the madness of Timewarp the following day. 



The Black Weekend

09. The Black Weekend
March 8 - March 11
Chamonix Ski Resort
Mont Blanc, France


Given the success of Snowbombing down the years, it's surprising that more festivals like it haven't sprung up in its wake. A boutique French equivalent is The Black Weekend, based out of Chamonix, the popular French ski resort on Mont Blanc (Europe's highest peak), which will again be the host location for this fourth edition. If you're making the trip you'll have parties to contend with in both the day and night (including the curiously titled Hot Dog Day) in addition, of course, to the winter sports. In terms of talent there looks to be no fixed sound, rather a digestible selection of DJ and live acts from across scenes, including Carl Craig, DJ Hell, Nick Curly, Noze and I:Cube. 

RA pick: Get drunk; dance to Noze; fall in the snow. 



5 Days Off

08. 5 Days Off
March 7 - March 11
Various Venues
Amsterdam, Netherlands


5 Days Off has crafted a reputation that goes beyond the presentation of quality electronic music. Never one to focus entirely on club nights, its younger sibling, 5 Days On, runs simultaneously, showcasing photography and film exhibitions at De Balie Expositie. Over five days (obviously) a wild variety of music will take over two of Amsterdam's most reputable clubs, Paradiso and Melkweg. WhoMadeWho play the opening night at Paradiso, while the UK flow of SBTRKT will provide the kick-off at Melkweg. The intensity is bound to lift with Gaslamp Killer and Hudson Mohawke playing the same bill on Thursday, while day three sees the audio/visual Monolake show nestle in alongside a stable of Ostgut artists, including Steffi, Ben Klock, Tobias. and Ryan Elliott.

RA pick: Jeff Mills celebrates 20 years of his Axis label with an extended set at Melkweg on day two. 



Awakenings Rotterdam

07. Awakenings Rotterdam
March 3
Maassilo 
Rotterdam, Netherlands


When it comes to stadium-sized techno, there aren't many brands more renowned than Awakenings. Held several times a year at various locations across The Netherlands, the festival series is well known for packing a punch with each edition, generally hosting acts that are placed at the tougher end of the techno spectrum. Things are a little more varied this time around, however, with a relatively varied lineup that features the synth-heavy and melodic sounds of Gui Boratto alongside no nonsense names like Speedy J and Gary Beck. Further down the bill you'll find Pan-Pot, Tiefschwarz and Guillaume & The Coutu Dumonts, each of whom will be dishing out some house-oriented material at the hulking Maassilo complex.

RA pick: Local export Speedy J should bring the goods to his hometown crowd. 



SXSW

06. SXSW
March 9 - March 18
Various Venues 
Austin, Texas


A cramped pub. An alley way. In the bed of a truck. Outside a taco shack. Your friend's sisters' University of Texas dorm room. Every square inch is a "venue" during SXSW. Thousands of trend seekers, setters, makers and the guys with badges looking for the convention center (yes, this is a conference as well) all make the journey to the Texas capital to catch a glimpse of this year's potential breakthrough acts. With a reputation built over the last 20-plus years, the event is no longer just the epicenter of indie rock, and is quickly becoming a stop-off for the acoustic and electronically inclined. Chrissy Murderbot, Com Truise, Oneohtrix Point Never and SBTRKT are just a few of the electronic artists you might catch at this year's festival, among hundreds of other rock, folk, hip-hop and experimental artists. And don't worry if you can't afford the badges: beyond the limited capacity at some of the official events, other east Austin happenings are fair game for entry. 

RA pick: Thundercat's debut album may have been slept on by some last year, but don't make the same mistake at SXSW. 



Playground Weekender

05. Playground Weekender
March 2 - March 4 
Del Rio Riverside Resort
Wisemans Ferry, Australia


Playground Weekender is one of Australia's favourite boutique festivals. Held in lush riverside surrounds situated a short drive from Sydney, the three-day event has been celebrated for its relaxed atmosphere and left-of-centre lineups, a combination that has seen the Playground Weekender garner a healthy reputation all around the country. This time around, you'll be able to catch Bonobo, Fat Freddys Drop and Roots Manuva among the house sounds of Damian Lazarus, Lee Burridge and Art Department. Elsewhere on the bill sits disco veteran Greg Wilson, proto-ravers The Orb and Applied Rhythm Technology boss Kirk Degiorgio.

RA pick: Greg Wilson doing his time-honoured thing at the Big Top stage.



Ultra Music Festival

04. Ultra Music Festival
March 23 - March 25
Bayfront Park
Miami, US

Day One | Day Two | Day Three 

When it comes to taking the temperature of the mainstream US dance market, Ultra seems like as good a patient as any. So how much should be read into the event's more underground house and techno bookings this year? Hard to say. But perhaps 2012 will be the year that—dovetailing the recent EDM upsurge in the country—the likes of Seth Troxler and Jamie Jones (both booked for the Sunday) begin to enjoy a next level of Stateside success. What hasn't changed in 2012 is the basic premise: three days of music during WMC week, roughly 150,000 attendees, and numerous colossal stages, dealing in the biggest dance sounds on the planet, with headliners this year including Kraftwerk, Justice, Carl Cox and Sven Vath. 

RA pick: Kraftwerk's Friday night performance (for obvious reasons). 



Future Music Festival

03. Future Music Festival
March 3 - March 12
Various Venues 
Various Cities, Australia

Brisbane | Perth | Sydney | Melbourne | Adelaide

While other Australian electronic and dance music festivals are tending towards more mainstream acts, Future Music Festival continues to evolve by looking to offer a broader range of music to its punters. This year's tour will be headlined by the newly reformed New Order (sans Peter Hook) which gives an indication as to the outside-the-box thinking that goes into the festival. DFA acts past and present will be generously represented, with James Murphy & Pat Mahoney, Hercules & Love Affair, The Rapture, Benoit & Sergio, Holy Ghost! and The Juan Maclean all tagging along. House and techno fans will have something to cheer about also, with DJ sets from Jamie Jones and Sven Vath, as well as a live performance from Aphex Twin. Throw in some Horse Meat Disco and you're looking at a pretty solid day out.

RA pick: Sing along to the Benoit & Sergio live show if you know the words.



Timewarp

02. Timewarp
March 31
Maimarkthalle
Mannheim, Germany


For one weekend every March, things look a little bit light lineup-wise in nightclubs around the world. That's because all of techno's leading lights are making their way to Mannheim to kick off the European festival season at Time Warp. Critics sometimes argue that Time Warp hasn't changed their headliners much in the past few years. But look at it the other way around: Why do you think that people like Sven, Richie, Ricardo, Carola, Dice and Dubfire keep coming back for more? It's one of the best run large-scale festivals around, an event whose sprawl necessitates the Maimarkthalle complex, but somehow makes it feel relatively intimate. Joining the aforementioned biggies this year will be a focus on techno in all its forms: Adam Beyer, Chris Liebing, DJ Rush and Dettmann & Klock will all perform, along with another lengthy set coming from Laurent Garnier and his LBS project.

RA pick: For a spot of house, see hometown hero Nick Curly go back-to-back with Mathias Kaden.



WMC

01. Miami WMC
March 16 - March 25
Various Venues
Miami, US



Things got a little weird in Miami last year, what with the Winter Music Conference/Ultra split and the confusion that ensued, but in 2012 it all looks set to get back on track. The conference itself is twice as long, which naturally means more parties, and while Sunday School will be sorely missed, the rest of the usual suspects will no doubt deliver: Crosstown Rebels getting lost at Electric Pickle, Listed with their fleet of intimate boat parties, The Shelborne's non-stop poolside soirees, and so many more. It might take a certain kind of personality (or maybe sense of humor) to fully enjoy it, but you'd be hard-pressed to find something more colorful and expansive than Miami during WMC.

RA pick: Hard to say with so few lineups announced, but you really can't beat the no-frills hedonism of Electric Pickle. 

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15 February 2012 11:49
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NAMM 2012

NAMM 2012

RA's Mark Strauss reports back from one of the most important (and exciting) events on the music technology calendar. 

You may have noticed a surge of activity on Twitter and Facebook in the past few weeks from many of the makers of your favorite audio gear. All at once, companies like Moog, Arturia, UAD, and others shot out press releases announcing major new products aimed at DJs and music makers. The reason for this seemingly choreographed onslaught of competitive PR is simple—it's NAMM season.

NAMM, which is short for the National Association of Music Merchants, is an organization that holds an annual conference in Anaheim, California every January. Just like E3 is for the gaming industry or CES is for gadget geeks, the NAMM conference is a chance for the major players in the business to get together and show off what they've been working on for the past year (or more in many cases). 

There are many reasons for musicians and producers alike to get excited for it as well. Producers who like to stay current with the latest and greatest gear trends likely spend the weeks preceding NAMM glued to Twitter or blogs to see what's new. Those who might be preparing for a big studio purchase are wise to wait until the NAMM announcements have all been made public to see what options are going to be newly available in the coming months. And if you've been out of the loop for a while, NAMM can be a great place to get a feel for the current pulse in music technology.

After tracking NAMMs gone by from the comfort of my own home for the past few years, I finally made the jump this year and traveled to the west coast to see the spectacle in person. From the crowded and very noisy floor of the Anaheim Convention Center, I sifted through countless demos in order to filter out the most interesting of what I saw and reported back. So without further ado, here's what to get excited about in 2012. 





SYNTHS

There were quite a few notable synths shown off at NAMM this year. Among these, some like John Bowen's Solarishave been seen before, but are finally on the verge of getting a solid release date. Others, like Stefan Schmidt's epic handmade analog synth remain a thing of beauty but still out of the reach of reality. To me, though, the most interesting of NAMM's synth announcements came from three gear makers who each unveiled new analog hardware synths that look like they will fall comfortably in the range of affordability for those who are in the market.




Moog Minitaur

Moog was first out of the gates with a pre-NAMM announcement that they would be releasing a desktop format version of their legendary Taurus bass pedals. The Minitaur's small 8.5" x 5.25" size and one-knob-per-function interface will make it a big hit for people who want the Moog two-oscillator bass sound at its most affordable price yet, and don't need all of the controls of the Voyager or Phatty lines. Moog reports that the Minitaur will be available in the spring for $679.




Arturia MINIBrute

There must have been some subconscious alignment in the Arturia and Moog marketing departments, with Arturia delivering a mini-themed analog synth as well. The MINIBrute is a surprising addition to Arturia's product line, which up until this year has been concentrated mostly on software instruments, with the only hardware existing in a support role. This new announcement changes all that though—the MINIBrute is a 100% analog keyboard with a full panel of hands-on control. Additionally, Arturia have developed some interesting new synthesis parameters with names like Metalizer, Ultrasaw and Brute Factor. With that feature set, the announced price point of $549 is pretty amazing; it's safe to say the MINIBrute will be showing up everywhere once it's released in April.




Waldorf Pulse 2

Waldorf was also at NAMM this year with a new addition to their lineup, a re-release of the legendary Pulse synth that had its heyday in the late '90s. The Pulse 2 retains the three-oscillator architecture of the original, adds some new features like paraphonic mode and an arpeggiator, and stuffs all of that into a smaller form that looks to be identical to their Blofeld digital synth. This appears to be the most feature-rich option of the three new analog synthesizers, with an extensive modulation matrix and preset storage. Unfortunately, the prototype at NAMM this year was not working, so we didn't get to hear how it sounds, but it will be reportedly available this summer for 549 euros.






RECORDING

There is always a ton of expensive boutique recording devices among the new releases at NAMM, and this year was no different. Among the usual suspects though, there were a pair of standouts that appeared to provide more utility than just audiophile-grade sparkle. 




RME Fireface UCX

The RME booth had a few new interesting options in the higher-end of the recording spectrum, but the one that stuck out was their new UCX audio interface. The UCX has RME's new and very impressive Hammerfall audio core, which means that you can run it with either USB or FireWire, and at the extremely low latency levels that RME are famous for. In addition, there is a pretty substantial DSP engine built into the UCX, which allows you to add effects like reverb and compression to the incoming signal without adding any latency or jitter. Finally, the UCX supports a new breakout box called the Advanced Remote control, which acts like a very smart monitor controller.




Universal Audio Apollo

Universal Audio had a very impressive booth this year at NAMM, with some great demos and live recording sessions that showed off their products. Even more impressive though, was their newest release—a high-end audio interface calledApollo. Like the UCX, the Apollo comes with onboard DSP effects, but takes it to an entirely new level. If you're familiar with UA, their calling card is their UAD Powered line of plugins, which run on DSP breakout boxes like the Duo and Quad. The Apollo comes with these same exact DSP chips built in, so you can apply the effects both pre-DAW and in the plugin form. One of the demos that UA showed off was a video of a live recording session with a band that was tracked directly through an Apollo into ProTools without any additional mixing. It sounded pretty impressive. 




AIAIAI TMA-1 Studio

The Copenhagen-based design collaborative AIAIAI was tucked away in an unfortunate spot at this year's NAMM, but the trek through the incredibly noisy drum section was worth it to check out their new TMA-1 Studio headphones. They share much of the same no-nonsense minimal design aesthetic of the TMA-1, but add a few new upgrades. The most notable is that they now employ an over-the-ear design that will allow for more comfort than the original when using them for long periods of time. 






EFFECTS

In the effects department there were quite a few new releases at NAMM, spanning all ranges of the affordability spectrum. Measured in sheer quantity, guitar pedals seem to have the majority of the floor space when it comes to effects, but there were some interesting options released for the studio or live use as well. 




Korg Mini Kaoss Pad 2

Starting at the low end with regards to price and size, Korg unveiled a pair of new ultra-portable additions to their Kaoss family of products. The most intriguing of these is the Mini Kaoss Pad 2, a powerful upgrade to the existing Mini Kaoss Pad. The original was improved in almost every way, with a very nice looking OLED screen, sample playback via microSD slot, a built-in microphone, and a bunch of new effects being added to the normal Kaoss Pad design aesthetic. It's very small size and relatively affordable price of $220 will put this thing in a bunch of people's hands when it is released in May.




KOMA Elektronik BD101 / FT201

The BD101 and FT201 are a pair of interesting new effect units created by Berlin-based KOMA, a relatively new boutique company run by musicians. It's tough for smaller companies like this to have a NAMM presence on their own, so we found these two pieces on display in the booth of the modular specialist store Big City Music. Both of these desktop effect modules feature a 10 socket CV / audio patch bay and an onboard infrared motion controller, which lend them to being used with modular-style analog gear. The BD101 is a gate / delay unit that can create a surprising amount of tone adjustment, and the FT201 is a vactrol state variable filter with a 10 step sequencer. KOMA is already selling the pedals direct from their website for 329 and 349 euros, respectively.






MIDI GEAR
Not surprisingly, MIDI still reigns supreme when it comes to controller announcements—and this year's NAMM lineup was no exception. There were some bizarre options, like MIDI pianos built into a rocket ship, keyboards that fold in half, and a small resurgence of keytars, but on the whole a pretty standard wave of portable and studio MIDI controllers were announced. 




Akai MAX49

Akai came out strong this year with an announcement to partner with iZotope, and a whole new line of computer-based MPC controllers. Perhaps the most interesting announcement they made, though, was the introduction of the MAX49 MIDI keyboard. It features a completely over-hauled keyboard of their own manufacture, and a new set of drum pads which have been redesigned to be much more sensitive (and they felt great during the demo). What's really unique about the MAX49 is the fact that it has CV outputs for trigger and gate, which can be used to drive analog gear either from the keyboard or from the built-in sequencer. 




Keith McMillen QuNeo

Keith McMillen, the creator of the SoftStep and 12 Step foot controllers showed off his new drum pad controller, which he calls the QuNeo. At first glance it doesn't look like much, with no labels and a pretty standard layout of pads, faders, and buttons. There is a lot going on under the covers, though: Each of the QuNeo's pads send velocity and continuous pressure info as well as x-y location, and there are multi-touch sensitive encoders and strips that (according to the demo guys) have more resolution than most timecode vinyl. The data can be sent via MIDI without needing a driver, or the QuNeo can be switched into OSC mode and transmit via an intermediary application. Top it all off with the fact that there is multi-color LED feedback on every control, and the thing looks great for $199.






DJ GEAR

All of the usual suspects had their DJ gear on display this year, and quite a few newcomers made some moves to get involved in the world of digital DJing, with wave after wave of jogwheel-style controllers showing up wherever we went. Once you got past the toys, and the Chinese knock-offs, there were a handful of standouts that could turn out to be big news in the DJ world this year.




Numark 4TRAK

Among the interesting new additions found in the Numark booth this year was a new competitor within the high-end Traktor controller market. It sports two very high-resolution jogwheels (3600 ticks per rotation) with two-color LED rings and a huge amount of knobs and buttons, which transmit 14-bit MIDI for super accurate four-channel mixing. Its standout feature, though, is the tilted 12-knob strip that Numark calls the FX Kommand Console. These twelve dedicated knobs give you quick access to the filter and FX devices within Traktor. The 4TRAK rounds things out with a built-in sound card that provides plenty of inputs (4 line, 2 RCA turntable, and 2 microphone) and balanced outputs. It is reportedly going to be available by March with a street price of $1099 (MSRP $1499). 




Allen & Heath Xone:DB2 / Xone:K2

At the A&H booth, among the usual lineup of mixers there was a setup of two new devices from the British manufacturer. The Xone:DB2 might already be familiar to you since it was announced back in September. Essentially, it is a stripped down version of the DB4, the powerhouse digital FX mixer that we reviewed this year. The DB2 achieves a lower price point by giving up the dedicated loopers per channel and reducing the FX units from 4 to 2 (now routable by bus). The K2 is a very interesting new release that takes inspiration from Native Instruments' Traktor Kontrol X1, in that it shares the same form factor and size. The biggest difference is that in addition to MIDI control, the K2 also functions as a standalone USB soundcard—a very nice addition. 
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15 February 2012 11:44
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Лучщие миди клавиатуры за 200 евро

Best in gear: Keyboard MIDI controllers over €200

In the market for a MIDI keyboard and have some money to spend? Step right up.

As you may recall, back in March we took a head-first dive into the crowded world of MIDI keyboard controllers. In doing so, we sifted through the many options out there—selecting a handful of the top items on the market and discussing the strengths and weaknesses of each. Those comparisons often lent themselves naturally to a certain type of artist who we thought would be a good match for a given keyboard—after all, as in many things, what's best for me might not be best for you. 

That initial piece was constrained to the keyboards that could be bought new for less than 200 euros, and as such featured mostly smaller, more mobile units designed for touring or producing on the go. When it comes time to shop for a keyboard for a studio environment, however, most likely you're going to be looking for something with a higher build quality, a larger octave range, and most likely some way of controlling your DAW. To that end, for this follow-up we increased the budget to 1000 euros and looked for the best of the best when it comes to the heart of many studios—the master MIDI keyboard. 





(Avid) Axiom Pro 61

Released: May 2009
Approx: 389 euro
(Avid) Axiom Pro 61



The first on this list is

the brand most people (especially in the US) associate with MIDI keyboards. M-Audio has been in the game for nearly a decade, starting with the ubiquitous Oxygen 25 back in 2002. Introduced in 2009, the Axiom Pro line is the newest generation of M-Audio's MIDI lineup, and has quite a few new tricks up its sleeve. 

Behind its rather unusual white exterior (a bold choice) lies a surprisingly sophisticated controller that allows for two-way communication between most major DAWs via its HyperControl Technology. Believe it or not, this actually allows for more out-of-the-box integrated control over DAWs like Logic, Cubase, and Ableton Live than you can find with more established platforms like Novation's Automap. 

For example, when using HyperControl within Logic you can actually load and control Logic's internal effects from the Axiom Pro keyboard itself. In Ableton Live, almost every internal device has been mapped in some sort of fashion as well. You can even configure HyperControl to send computer keyboard macros, which can be helpful for program functions that can't be MIDI mapped. For more information on HyperControl compatibility with your DAW of choice, M-Audio has published documentation on their website which spells out the options for the major platforms out there.





Remote 61 SL MKII

Released: April 2009
Approx: 444 euro
Pod Studio KB37


When the Axiom Pro line was announced, it drew immediate comparisons to Novation's firmly established Remote SL family of MIDI keyboards. The Remote SL is the high end of the Novation line, with an eye-popping 56 knobs, faders and buttons sitting above a high-quality Fatar keybed. As evidenced by the MKII tag, this is the second generation of the Remote SL family. The differences from the first are noticeable, with the MKII giving up one LCD screen in order to gain touch-sensitive controls and LED feedback for the endless knobs. 

The touch-sensitivity of the controls is a pretty big positive, as it works in concert with Novation's renowned Automap software—which pops into view when you touch a control to show you what parameter it currently has assigned. Since the previous piece in March, Novation has released version 4 of Automap. Among these updates are a new streamlined setup process and more options to allow you to configure the level of GUI feedback shown for control changes. 

The Remote SL has two advantages over the Axiom Pro: The Automap software makes doing on-the-fly assignments much easier than HyperControl, thanks to the touch-sensitivity and the way that it can wrap plugins. Also, the Remote SL is better at controlling external hardware without the aid of a computer, thanks to its LCD display and template storage system.





MPK 88

Released: April 2009
Approx: 655 euro
MPK 88


If you're a fan of the legendary Akai MPC hardware sampler design with the square pad matrix, you should take a look at the Akai MPK 88. It has the same 4x4 pad layout as a real MPC (with true MPC pads) and a pretty full complement of knobs, faders and buttons. In addition to the pads, the MPK separates itself further from its competition with support for many of the original MPC features, like Note Repeat, Swing, Full Level, 16-Level, Tap Tempo and Time Division. To accomplish many of these, the MPK is smart enough to speak the language of MIDI Clock—either acting as the clock master, or by synchronizing itself to the clock being sent from your DAW. 

With its 88 keys, the MPK is the first of the MIDI keyboards considered thus far that could support the full range of notes required to play any piano piece. While this may seem overkill for many people, if you have a piano background you understand how important it is to have the freedom to roam across the octaves. The MPK 88 also takes things even further, as its keybed is fully weighted to recreate the same hammer action of a grand piano. 

As it ships, the MPK is unfortunately chained to a computer. Akai does not ship the MP6-1 power adapter, so you're forced to power the MPK via USB initially. This is an unfortunate omission for one of the higher priced keyboards in our list, but with all of the other features baked in, we can't complain too much about an extra 30 euro purchase.





Numa
Studiologic
www.fatar.com

Released: June 2008
Approx: 966 euro
Numa


Speaking of weighted keys, if you happen to be Francesco Tristano, or if you are a serious pianist who needs a MIDI controller that responds as closely to the real thing as it gets, check out the Studiologic Numa. Every one of the 88 keys of this minimalistically-styled keyboard is composed of solid body material and is weighted to match a grand piano. To give you an idea of how serious they are about it, on a real piano, the keys at the top of the piano have a lighter action (require less of a push) than the keys at the bottom. That's a side effect of the mechanics of a piano, and is subtle enough that most keyboard manufacturers don't give it a second thought. The Numa's keyboard, however, has this response mechanism built in.

Things get even crazier when you start to get into the way Numa handles velocity curves. Velocity curves are a way for keyboards to adjust the range of power of the notes to compensate for the player's style. Normally MIDI keyboards don't support velocity curve choices, and the ones that do only allow for a handful of options. The Numa has its own velocity curve engine called You Play, which can learn a player's style and generate a custom velocity curve for them. These personalized shapes can then be saved in one of the 15 velocity curve slots. 

Unfortunately, once you get past the magnificent keyboard, there's not much to the Numa. The mod wheel is hidden on the side for some strange reason, and some users have reported issues with the touch-sensitive controls. However, if you're looking for the most authentic piano-style keyboard you can buy for under 1000 euros, the Numa is it.





Pod Studio KB37

Released: July 2009
Approx: 333 euro
Remote 61 SL MKII


If you happen to be a guitarist who wants to get into recording and producing, or if you are shopping for an audio interface in addition to a MIDI keyboard, the Pod Studio KB37 created by the guitar pedal specialists at Line 6 could be the best choice. The KB37 is the only keyboard among the Pod Studio family of devices which are USB audio interfaces created for recording guitar and vocals. In addition to six inputs and two outputs, the KB37 has 37 full-sized keys, pitch and mod wheel, a handful of buttons and knobs, and a pair of VU meters to monitor your volume levels.

What makes the Pod Studio keyboard unique is the high quality onboard preamps which are made for recording guitar and vocals, and the Pod Farm software. The Pod Farm is a virtual amp simulation software suite that allows you to route different amps, cabs, effect pedals and mic preamps to achieve the right tone. The effect chains can then be saved as presets, and any audio running into the Pod Studio keyboard interface is instantly affected by the preset, with zero latency introduced. It achieves the zero latency monitoring by running at the driver level, rather than as a plugin in your DAW host. The downside to this is that the audio goes into the DAW post-effect, which means that adjustments to the Pod Farm effects after recording aren't possible. As an alternative, the Pod Farm plugin mode can be unlocked via an upgrade purchasable on the Line 6 website—however in this age of unlimited choices, some forced creative limitations could be a good thing.





Ultranova

Released: September 2010
Approx: 569 euro
Ultranova


The last MIDI keyboard on our list follows the same multi-functional approach of the KB37, and takes it even further. In addition to being a MIDI keyboard (of course) and an audio interface like the KB37, the Ultranova is also a very powerful synthesizer based around the well-loved Supernova II rack synth made popular in the early '00s. 

The synthesis portion is based on a pretty robust 3-oscillator virtual analog style engine, which allows up to 18 note polyphony. There are 14 conventional waveforms and 36 wavetables, 14 filter types, 6 envelope generators, 3 LFOs and 5 simultaneous FX per voice. Also, Novation provides a software editor that can run as a plug-in in your DAW, similar to the Virus Control plugin for the Access Virus TI line of synths. 

The reason we are including the Ultranova in this list is that in addition to this synth engine and the 2-in 4-out audio interface, it has the same touch-sensitive knob technology of the other Novation MIDI controllers. It's only logical, therefore that Novation has included a mode to convert the Ultranova into an Automap-enabled MIDI controller at the push of a button, with the touch-sensitive knobs being able to be assigned and control the parameters of a plugin or DAW. 
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15 February 2012 11:39
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Лучщие миди клавиатуры за 200 евро

Best in gear: Keyboard MIDI controllers over €200

In the market for a MIDI keyboard and have some money to spend? Step right up.

As you may recall, back in March we took a head-first dive into the crowded world of MIDI keyboard controllers. In doing so, we sifted through the many options out there—selecting a handful of the top items on the market and discussing the strengths and weaknesses of each. Those comparisons often lent themselves naturally to a certain type of artist who we thought would be a good match for a given keyboard—after all, as in many things, what's best for me might not be best for you. 

That initial piece was constrained to the keyboards that could be bought new for less than 200 euros, and as such featured mostly smaller, more mobile units designed for touring or producing on the go. When it comes time to shop for a keyboard for a studio environment, however, most likely you're going to be looking for something with a higher build quality, a larger octave range, and most likely some way of controlling your DAW. To that end, for this follow-up we increased the budget to 1000 euros and looked for the best of the best when it comes to the heart of many studios—the master MIDI keyboard. 





(Avid) Axiom Pro 61

Released: May 2009
Approx: 389 euro
(Avid) Axiom Pro 61


The first on this list is the brand most people (especially in the US) associate with MIDI keyboards. M-Audio has been in the game for nearly a decade, starting with the ubiquitous Oxygen 25 back in 2002. Introduced in 2009, the Axiom Pro line is the newest generation of M-Audio's MIDI lineup, and has quite a few new tricks up its sleeve. 

Behind its rather unusual white exterior (a bold choice) lies a surprisingly sophisticated controller that allows for two-way communication between most major DAWs via its HyperControl Technology. Believe it or not, this actually allows for more out-of-the-box integrated control over DAWs like Logic, Cubase, and Ableton Live than you can find with more established platforms like Novation's Automap. 

For example, when using HyperControl within Logic you can actually load and control Logic's internal effects from the Axiom Pro keyboard itself. In Ableton Live, almost every internal device has been mapped in some sort of fashion as well. You can even configure HyperControl to send computer keyboard macros, which can be helpful for program functions that can't be MIDI mapped. For more information on HyperControl compatibility with your DAW of choice, M-Audio has published documentation on their website which spells out the options for the major platforms out there.





Remote 61 SL MKII

Released: April 2009
Approx: 444 euro
Pod Studio KB37


When the Axiom Pro line was announced, it drew immediate comparisons to Novation's firmly established Remote SL family of MIDI keyboards. The Remote SL is the high end of the Novation line, with an eye-popping 56 knobs, faders and buttons sitting above a high-quality Fatar keybed. As evidenced by the MKII tag, this is the second generation of the Remote SL family. The differences from the first are noticeable, with the MKII giving up one LCD screen in order to gain touch-sensitive controls and LED feedback for the endless knobs. 

The touch-sensitivity of the controls is a pretty big positive, as it works in concert with Novation's renowned Automap software—which pops into view when you touch a control to show you what parameter it currently has assigned. Since the previous piece in March, Novation has released version 4 of Automap. Among these updates are a new streamlined setup process and more options to allow you to configure the level of GUI feedback shown for control changes. 

The Remote SL has two advantages over the Axiom Pro: The Automap software makes doing on-the-fly assignments much easier than HyperControl, thanks to the touch-sensitivity and the way that it can wrap plugins. Also, the Remote SL is better at controlling external hardware without the aid of a computer, thanks to its LCD display and template storage system.





MPK 88

Released: April 2009
Approx: 655 euro
MPK 88


If you're a fan of the legendary Akai MPC hardware sampler design with the square pad matrix, you should take a look at the Akai MPK 88. It has the same 4x4 pad layout as a real MPC (with true MPC pads) and a pretty full complement of knobs, faders and buttons. In addition to the pads, the MPK separates itself further from its competition with support for many of the original MPC features, like Note Repeat, Swing, Full Level, 16-Level, Tap Tempo and Time Division. To accomplish many of these, the MPK is smart enough to speak the language of MIDI Clock—either acting as the clock master, or by synchronizing itself to the clock being sent from your DAW. 

With its 88 keys, the MPK is the first of the MIDI keyboards considered thus far that could support the full range of notes required to play any piano piece. While this may seem overkill for many people, if you have a piano background you understand how important it is to have the freedom to roam across the octaves. The MPK 88 also takes things even further, as its keybed is fully weighted to recreate the same hammer action of a grand piano. 

As it ships, the MPK is unfortunately chained to a computer. Akai does not ship the MP6-1 power adapter, so you're forced to power the MPK via USB initially. This is an unfortunate omission for one of the higher priced keyboards in our list, but with all of the other features baked in, we can't complain too much about an extra 30 euro purchase.





Numa
Studiologic
www.fatar.com

Released: June 2008
Approx: 966 euro
Numa


Speaking of weighted keys, if you happen to be Francesco Tristano, or if you are a serious pianist who needs a MIDI controller that responds as closely to the real thing as it gets, check out the Studiologic Numa. Every one of the 88 keys of this minimalistically-styled keyboard is composed of solid body material and is weighted to match a grand piano. To give you an idea of how serious they are about it, on a real piano, the keys at the top of the piano have a lighter action (require less of a push) than the keys at the bottom. That's a side effect of the mechanics of a piano, and is subtle enough that most keyboard manufacturers don't give it a second thought. The Numa's keyboard, however, has this response mechanism built in.

Things get even crazier when you start to get into the way Numa handles velocity curves. Velocity curves are a way for keyboards to adjust the range of power of the notes to compensate for the player's style. Normally MIDI keyboards don't support velocity curve choices, and the ones that do only allow for a handful of options. The Numa has its own velocity curve engine called You Play, which can learn a player's style and generate a custom velocity curve for them. These personalized shapes can then be saved in one of the 15 velocity curve slots. 

Unfortunately, once you get past the magnificent keyboard, there's not much to the Numa. The mod wheel is hidden on the side for some strange reason, and some users have reported issues with the touch-sensitive controls. However, if you're looking for the most authentic piano-style keyboard you can buy for under 1000 euros, the Numa is it.





Pod Studio KB37

Released: July 2009
Approx: 333 euro
Remote 61 SL MKII


If you happen to be a guitarist who wants to get into recording and producing, or if you are shopping for an audio interface in addition to a MIDI keyboard, the Pod Studio KB37 created by the guitar pedal specialists at Line 6 could be the best choice. The KB37 is the only keyboard among the Pod Studio family of devices which are USB audio interfaces created for recording guitar and vocals. In addition to six inputs and two outputs, the KB37 has 37 full-sized keys, pitch and mod wheel, a handful of buttons and knobs, and a pair of VU meters to monitor your volume levels.

What makes the Pod Studio keyboard unique is the high quality onboard preamps which are made for recording guitar and vocals, and the Pod Farm software. The Pod Farm is a virtual amp simulation software suite that allows you to route different amps, cabs, effect pedals and mic preamps to achieve the right tone. The effect chains can then be saved as presets, and any audio running into the Pod Studio keyboard interface is instantly affected by the preset, with zero latency introduced. It achieves the zero latency monitoring by running at the driver level, rather than as a plugin in your DAW host. The downside to this is that the audio goes into the DAW post-effect, which means that adjustments to the Pod Farm effects after recording aren't possible. As an alternative, the Pod Farm plugin mode can be unlocked via an upgrade purchasable on the Line 6 website—however in this age of unlimited choices, some forced creative limitations could be a good thing.





Ultranova

Released: September 2010
Approx: 569 euro
Ultranova


The last MIDI keyboard on our list follows the same multi-functional approach of the KB37, and takes it even further. In addition to being a MIDI keyboard (of course) and an audio interface like the KB37, the Ultranova is also a very powerful synthesizer based around the well-loved Supernova II rack synth made popular in the early '00s. 

The synthesis portion is based on a pretty robust 3-oscillator virtual analog style engine, which allows up to 18 note polyphony. There are 14 conventional waveforms and 36 wavetables, 14 filter types, 6 envelope generators, 3 LFOs and 5 simultaneous FX per voice. Also, Novation provides a software editor that can run as a plug-in in your DAW, similar to the Virus Control plugin for the Access Virus TI line of synths. 

The reason we are including the Ultranova in this list is that in addition to this synth engine and the 2-in 4-out audio interface, it has the same touch-sensitive knob technology of the other Novation MIDI controllers. It's only logical, therefore that Novation has included a mode to convert the Ultranova into an Automap-enabled MIDI controller at the push of a button, with the touch-sensitive knobs being able to be assigned and control the parameters of a plugin or DAW. 
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15 February 2012 11:38
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Native Instruments/Heavyocity - Damage

Damage, as its name suggests, is a library of percussive hits and loops with industrial carnage at its core. Shipped in boxed form on two DVDs, it's released as a collaborative effort between Native Instruments and Heavyocity. It is compatible with the former's Kontakt instrument both in "full" form, or for the free-to-download Kontakt Player. The library, once installed and unpacked, provides you with 30GB of content, with pre-made loops rubbing shoulders with individual hits layered up in construction kits. However, rather than just being a playback device for the samples and loops, the way Damage is organized allows for huge modification of the sounds and myriad opportunities to personalize the library's content.

Damage's sounds have all been recorded specifically for this library and I can only imagine it was enormous fun to put together. Among the sound sources are cars and machines being beaten to death with sledgehammers, machines grinding into one another to the point of destruction, as well as a collection of more traditional percussion instruments. These have all been bound up into Loop Menus—groups of matched sounds which work well within a particular genre, Single Loops—individual loops over which you have greater levels of control—and Construction Kits of individual hits. There are 58 kits, which draw on a bank of 200 sound sources recorded into 500 single shot elements. 

The true power of this library comes to the fore when you begin exploring the options provided by NI/Heavyocity's GUI. The options change depending on which type of loop or kit you're working on, with interface pages, relevant to each, clickable in the top right-hand corner of the window. Within the Loop Menus, for instance, you'll find a Main Page, one for T(rigger)-FX and a third for EQ/Filter. On the main page, you can switch on Master Effects with modules to configure Distortion, LoFi, Reverb, Delay and Compressor settings on the left and an Amp ADSR-style envelope on the right. 



In the middle, you'll find an Amp Sequencer which provides real-time "chopping" of loops via trigger keys. By default, there are six banks of these (labeled A-F) and within each bank, trigger notes A6-C7 super-impose a sliced pattern routed to the Amplifier output for as long as you hold one of those keys down. The effect is to chop up, slice, ramp or otherwise warp the playback of a loop's volume, though you can also "permanently" click one of these trigger keys on or program your own patterns to enhance the presets. 

In the T-FX window, real-time performance goes up a few more gears. Here you'll find eight modules of triggerable effects mapped from C6 upwards to produce Punch, Phaser, Rotator, Lo-Fi, Glitcher, Pitch Envelope, Filter Envelope and Delay effects which, again, last for as long as you're holding a trigger key. Each module features rotaries and buttons to allow you to configure effects and you can hold down as many as you like at once to trigger your own brand of carnage. 



The EQ/Filter page features a prominent amber circle which is a rotary dial to allow you to increase the "Punish" amount. This provides a program-specific combination of saturation, distortion and compression which is globally applied. To the left of this is a 3-band EQ with tweakable frequency and bandwidth controls, while resonant low and high-pass filters feature on the right. All three of these modules have orange LED switches so you only have to enable the ones you want to use. 

If you're getting a sense that this is more than just a library of industrial junk percussion, that feeling grows even stronger when you load a single loop. This time, as well as having the same effect options, you can dive in to look at the loop you've loaded and make slice-by-slice edits of the sounds mapped to your keyboard. So, you can assign level, pan and tuning offsets to each individual slice, as well as switch on real-time triggers to Randomize, Freeze and Drop slices, or use B0 to automatically reverse all samples within a loop.

The construction kits are hugely versatile too. In the main page of these, you'll be greeted with a Master Mixer of sliders which allows you to blend between the Close, Room and Hall microphones used to record the samples. Any of these can be muted or solo'd and, if you know you don't need one microphone's recordings for your current track, its samples can be purged to reduce the footprint size of the current program. 



Construction Kits also provide the EQ/Filter module common to the Loops but the additional page here—Stage—is remarkable. Each sample within a construction kit can be selected (simply press a key) and it will show within a 3D sound stage, offering 35 positions. Each of these allows you to blend stereo (left to right) position with space (front to back), so each sound within a kit can be placed wherever you like. Rather than having to create a sense of space by loading multiple kits and panning and reverberating huge collections of samples, you can do this within a single kit.

Damage is a bombastic library which will immediately be snapped up by sound designers and those working in composition for picture. In fact, you can expect this library to become the go-to one for action chase sequences and glitchy sci-fi textures for the next few months. However, as it's so configurable, it should prove an invaluable resource for producers of all kinds of music, with the individual hits slotting beautifully into dance records, pop productions and plenty of other genres too. It isn't cheap but it's genuinely thrilling. 

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14 February 2012 23:22
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RA Poll: Top DJs of 2011 (Самый авторитетный для меня журнал и топ)

RA Poll: Top DJs of 2011

RA begins two weeks of polls with the readers' choice of the finest DJs of the year.

Jambox by Jawbone

Electronic music is a global phenomenon, but for most of us, our perspectives are shaped by the cities in which we go raving. Tastes and trends vary from place to place, and it's nigh on impossible to keep tabs on the scene at large (unless you're a DJ and travel the world for a living). That's what's so fascinating about our annual poll of your favourite DJs: it's a rare chance to see the broad spectrum of who people like to see in clubs. It's like a distillation of countless parties around the world over a 12 month period: the late nights and fuzzy mornings of thousands of punters are funneled into a single list. 

In 2010 we had to admit that the top DJs poll wasn't radically different from the one in 2009. That is definitely not the case in 2011. Take spots #1 and #2, which changed hands for the first time in years. Then you've got the inevitable first-timers, one of whom makes his top 100 debut all the way up at #5. There are even a couple of DJs who appear twice (well, sort of). But enough chit chat—let's scroll down, shall we?




100. Subb-an

98. DVS1

96. Efdemin
DVS1
From the amount of time DVS1 spends in the booth atBerghain, you'd think they were grooming him for a residency. That would certainly make sense: with his balance of toughness, variety and emotional range, the Minnesota native is one of the finest acts in techno today.

95. Deetron
Joy Orbison
The key word with Joy Orbison is "discerning." He didn't play a ton of gigs outside of the UK in 2011, but every single one of them seemed to be at one of the best venues that country or city in question had to offer. 

90. Heidi
Dan Ghenacia
It's not easy being a deep house DJ in Paris, but Dan Ghenacia isn't complaining. For nearly 20 years, while French Touch, filter disco and eventually nu-rave blared at most of the city's clubs, he's been the beating heart of a small but proud underground scene.
Kerri Chandler
DC-10's curatorial hand and a relaunch of his Madhouseimprint had plenty to do with Kerri Chandler's 2011 renaissance, but it was his own stellar DJ sets that vaulted him into this list of the top jocks of the year.
Justin Martin
From their house and bass music hybrids to their infectious sense of humor (read: the video for "LEZGO"),Justin Martin and his fellow Dirtybirds have a way of keeping things fresh, which explains why they maintain such a special status in San Francisco and beyond.

72. Guy J
Guy J
Guy J proved that prog had plenty left to say in 2011 via his 1000 Words full-length. Clubbers agreed, flocking to see the Israeli jock push his uplifting 4/4 in venues around the world.

68. Shonky

66. Ame
Daniel Bortz
He's been DJing for 20 years, but Daniel Bortz may just be the sleeper success of 2011. Despite playing little outside of his native Germany, Bortz has cultivated a following through an adroit run of sample-heavy house tracks.

61. Surgeon
Donato Dozzy
More and more DJs play the type of ambient techno thatDonato Dozzy is so closely associated with. But take one look at this list and you'll realize that nobody else plays it in the same way. A master of atmosphere and touch, Dozzy is one of a kind.

59. Agoria
Nina Kraviz
What to expect from a Nina Kraviz DJ set? House and techno with a nod to the past. And more than likely somemistakes. The Russian selector spread her purist message further than ever in 2011.

52. Move D
Danny Daze
You could hardly escape Danny Daze's breakthrough track "Your Everything" in 2011 and, accordingly, he had some high-profile gigs in the UK to match. Expect to see him plenty more in clubs around the world in 2012.

50. Rhadoo

49. tINI

48. Steffi
tINI
tINI fully emerged from the lengthy shadow of Desolatlabel boss Loco Dice in 2011 with a debut album that allowed her more intricate take on house to come fully to the fore.

44. DJ Koze

42. Pan-Pot
Robag Wruhme
It's impossible to dislike Robag Wruhme. From the nonsense titles of his recorded mixes to the beats themselves, his glowing personality flows right into his music and has made him a perennial favourite.

37. Zip
Julio Bashmore
After a relatively barren spell during the '00s, home-grown house music is thriving again in the UK. Via his fresh and bass-heavy take on the sound, Bristol's Julio Bashmore is one of the key talents of this rejuvenated scene.

35. Ben UFO

33. Raresh

31. Cassy
Ben UFO
It almost goes without saying that bass music DJs play across the board these days—but no one does it with quite the same skill and panache as Hessle Audio co-founder and Rinse FM resident Ben UFO.

26. Dubfire
Damian Lazarus
"Whether you like Crosstown or not, Damian is one of those people that just fuckin' knows what he's doing,"said Maceo Plex earlier this year on the subject ofDamian Lazarus' A&R skills. The same could also be applied to his DJing.

25. Scuba

23. Magda
Chris Liebing
Chris Liebing's magnificent recent run of form continued in 2011, with the CLR label and its celebrated podcast series cementing its position as one of the go-to sources for the tougher end of the techno spectrum. 
Solomun
20. Solomun
Diynamic continued its reign as one of Germany's most vital imprints in 2011. Label boss Solomun had a lot to do with that, taking the imprint's sound to clubs around the globe while also making sure that their own hometown venue Ego was stocked by some of the world's best DJs. Celebrating an anniversary—five years of Diynamic—certainly didn't hurt matters much either. Add one of the year's most beloved remixes—his take on Noir & Haze's "Around"—on top of all of this, and you're left with the best year yet from the Bosnian-born DJ.
Marcel Dettmann
Ostgut Ton further expanded its brand of no nonsense techno and old school-indebted house outside of the confines of its Berlin home at the famedBerghain/Panorama Bar in 2011. The techno evangelism was largely due to the work of residents Marcel Dettmann and Ben Klock. While Klock largely kept his head down in the clubs, Dettmann found time to put out a solid mix CD, Conducted, on Music Manand 12-inches through 50 Weapons and Kontra-Musik. These outside endorsements further emphasize that the world has warmed up to the cold, steely techno that Dettmann loves so much.
Lee Foss
Earlier this year, Lee Foss told tracealine.com that "there will be a backlash, there's no way around it." As for now? Foss is riding high alongside Hot Creationspartner Jamie Jones, and an imprint that helped define 2011. With two solo EPs and a host of DJ gigs, Foss was as personally responsible as anyone for the trend. But he's no overnight success: He grew up in Chicago's hard knock scene, honed his sound in Los Angeles and now makes his home in the UK. In a few years, the backlash will arrive. If there are more years like 2011 before then, though, Foss will undoubtedly have far more fans than detractors.
Sasha
17. Sasha
God is a DJ—but he only warms up for Sasha, reads the title of Brendan Blood's semi-biographical book on the UK veteran, a playful nod to the famous 1994Mixmag cover story. Sasha may not command quite the same levels of reverence these days, but his latest appearance in our top 20 should go some way to emphasizing his enduring relevance. After a nine year break, Sasha got back together with Lee Burridge andCraig Richards to reform Tyrant this year, sprinkling some of that star power over the final event in our RA X series at Trouw in Amsterdam. 
Sven Vath
It was largely business as usual for Sven Vath in 2011. Although when you consider that "business" includes running a club, a booking agency, a record label, a weekly Ibiza residency and visiting the four corners of the globe to DJ, you realise that there's nothing "usual" about this. Germany's most famous techno DJ celebrated 30 years behind the decks, and while the mythical status surrounding his marathon sets, Ibiza afterparties and general debauchery continues to swirl, remaining steadfast might just be the secret to his success. 
Tale Of Us
In a year when RA's DJ poll underwent some massive changes, Tale Of Us' climb into the top 20 has to count as the most surprising. The group barely existed in 2010. Their beloved RA podcast, however, outlined exactly what they do in a club setting. Melodic, bouncy and pitched at right around 120 BPM, they hit at a moment when pop has been making a mighty comeback courtesy of Hot Creations and Visionquest—the latter of whom put out their Dark Song EP this year. Something tells us, however, that they'll be around for a while: Catchy tunes rarely go out of style.
Soul Clap
DJing may appear pretty simple. Soul Clap remind us that even the simplest stuff requires an expert hand to become something greater. The Boston duo dole out classics at a regular clip. The secret is in the way that they put them together. (Head down to one of their '90s Jam nights, and you'll hear exactly what we're talking about.) Over the course of two well-received mix CDs (one alongside Wolf + Lamb), they also showcased just how many future classics are on the way from friends and family, and proved that their 2010 entry into our DJ poll was anything but a fluke.
John Digweed
There's honestly not much to say about John Digweed at this point. What's most amazing about the progressive house king's longevity, however, is the longevity itself. Dance music is a young man's game, yet Diggers continues to add colors and countries to his already voluminous gig diary. Few DJs on this list have played MacedoniaCyprusIsrael and Taiwan. He did it in the past 12 months. It's Digweed's professionalism, consistency and dedication that keeps him booked every weekend in clubs around the world. The music, meanwhile, is what keeps crowds coming back year after year.
Luciano
12. Luciano
Those who say that Ibiza is dead need look no further than Cadenza's Luciano as a case study to the contrary. After spending a second season at the helm of his Sunday night shindig at Pacha, the label boss has positioned Cadenza as one of the most surefire brands on the island (and the world). Quite simply, Luciano brings the party like few others, whether it's via his label's tropical house sound or a well-timed and well-known a cappella. This year saw further success at Pacha, along with a continued nod to his underground roots, bringing the likes of MoodymannLarry Heard,Daniel Bell and more along for the ride.
Marco Carola
"I'm just expressing who I am, what I like to play and hear in the club," Marco Carola told us this year. The Italian veteran maintains his #11 placing in our poll this time out, speaking to his continued dedication to pushing the purest forms of the music he loves. Whether it's house, techno or something in between, there's always something unmistakably "Carola" about his pared-down, groove-based sets. As a Cocoonresident, Ibiza was a key territory for Carola this summer, while further afield he continued to enjoy one of the busiest worldwide touring schedules of any DJ. 
Ben Klock
It's nice to know an artist as uncompromising as Ben Klock can be so widely loved. Granted, he might throw in a few more house records than some of his fellowBerghain residents, but his overall sound is techno at its most punishing, and he always has the cojones to lay it on thick, even when he's playing somewhere far away from his home base in Berlin (which has been happening more and more). Few DJs could take such brutal rhythms and meld them into something so compelling. It's that finesse that makes him one of the best.
Maya Jane Coles
When we featured her in the RA podcast in January of this year, we felt pretty confident that Maya Jane Coles would have a strong year. What actually transpired was nothing short of incredible. The young London house producer has gone from a talented local name to a worldwide headlining force in what feels like the blink of an eye. 2011 has seen gigs stack up across Italy, Germany, Ibiza and the US, while labels like Crosstown Rebels2020 Vision and Hypercolour have all played host to her classicist house sound. As for 2012? Let's just say that there's really no limit to how far she can go.
Dixon
08. Dixon
"Drama" is the word that comes most immediately to mind with Dixon. In the catalogue of his label,Innervisions, nearly every track has a story to tell. It's the same way with his DJ sets. Rarely does a mix go by without the Berlin-based jock leaving you anticipating what's going to happen next. It's almost as if the transitions are as (or perhaps even more) important than the tracks themselves. A standout mix CD for Live At Robert Johnson proved this point. If his claims that it is to be his last are true, look for his frequent club gigs to underline it on a weekly basis. 
Loco Dice
Why do people always apply the same adjectives—"muscular," "physical"—to Loco Dice's sound? Well, firstly it avoids having to make an embarrassing fist-pumping action, and secondly these words are as close as it gets to describing something unique. See, the intriguing thing about the German DJ—and very often what sets him apart—isn't what he plays but theway he plays. This could be to do with his hip-hop background (discussed at length with us in January of this year) but what's certain is that Dice's take on house and techno is truly his own. 
Art Department
We described Jonny White and Kenny Glasgow's rise as "meteoric" back in October, and for the proof look no further than their touring schedule. The Canadian duo played a single gig in July 2010; the number of shows for the corresponding month this year? 18. What happened in between was a single of the year, "Without You," and a standout album, The Drawing Board, for Crosstown Rebels. The key difference between Art Department and so many other "breakthrough" acts, however, is that individually they've been doing this since the '90s—a fact that is only too evident from their artful DJ sets. 
Maceo Plex
It's safe to say Eric Estornel had a pretty killer year. After nearly two decades of DJing and making records––mostly as Maetrik, more recently as Maceo Plex––he released Life Index, a breakthrough album that thrust him into the limelight. A month later he played at Get Lost in Miami and arguably outshone all of his fellowCrosstown Rebels. The rest, as they say, is history. Today he makes it into the top 100 for the first time all the way up in the top five, easily the highest ranking debut since the RA DJ reader poll began.
Ricardo Villalobos
It could be said that Ricardo Villalobos enjoys a cult of personality: few artists fill clubs so easily, and as a debonair artiste with a hedonistic streak, he's underground clubland's perfect poster boy. But that only accounts for a small part of his following. Some two decades into his career, Villalobos still has that inimitable mad scientist quality, whether he's boggling minds at fabric or remixing modern jazz records for ECM. In some ways he's a victim of his own success—good luck catching him in an intimate setting these days—but he remains one of electronic music's true visionaries. 
Richie Hawtin
We expressed wonderment last year that Richie Hawtin bothered to DJ at all in 2010. The same was true in 2011: Taking his mammoth Plastikman show to smaller spaces and to another technological level might've been enough. It clearly wasn't, if his diary was any indication. Without three of his key compatriots—MagdaMarc Houle and Troy Pierce left to focus on Items & Things—it's clear that Hawtin will have to be more focused than ever in 2012. Judging by his work ethic, we'd be surprised if he weren't up to the challenge. 
Seth Troxler
In 2009, Seth Troxler told Little White Earbuds that he'd "retired" at age 16 when he quit his job at The Palace in Detroit (they wouldn't let him work with dreadlocks). Now 26, he hasn't held a "normal" job since, but that doesn't mean he hasn't put in the hours. 2011 was a dizzying year for Troxler—starting a label (Visionquest), founding a charity (Red Dot Relief) and playing at countless parties around the globe. His class clown persona might make it seem like he doesn't take any of it seriously, but nothing could be further from the truth. Seth Troxler is one of most driven DJs out there, and it pays off. 

Jamie Jones


"The chillest bro in dance music." 

That's the way one RA staff member described Jamie Jones earlier this year. And while that may be true behind the decks, the rise of the Hot Creations boss is more down to hard work. By our count, Jones was billed at 142 gigs in 2011, which means he nearly averaged a set every second day. Couple this with a lauded fabric CD, a whole host of remixes and the expert co-curation of a label that came to define the sound of clubland in 2011, and you're left with a simple equation. The hottest tracks + the most gigs = the #1 DJ of 2011.

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6 February 2012 21:26
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Какие направления музыки будут актуальны в этом году?

из личных наблюдений: всё что актуально на западе рано или поздно наберает сумашедший ход в России , далеко идти ненадо...вспомните тот же теч-хаус

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21 January 2012 19:19
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Top 10 November 2011 Festivals

по версии RA

http://www.residentadvisor.net/feature.aspx?1442

10. Creamfields Chile
November 11
Espacio Riesco Expo Centre 
Santiago, Chile


Creamfields stands as one of electronic music's most prominent electronic brands. Hence, you can generally expect that whenever it touches down—be it Sydney, London or Malta—the lineup it brings will be hefty. This year's Chilean edition, taking place in Santiago, is no different, with superstars like Sven Vath, Luciano and Pete Tong all scheduled to do their thing at the Espacio Riesco Expo Centre, just a little over 10km from city centre. Further down the bill, take your pick from the likes of Seth Troxler, Busy P and Joris Voorn, each of whom will be landing for sets that should go down nicely in the South American sun. 

RA pick: Over five years in, Booka Shade still have one of the best live shows in the business.



Mayday Poland

09. Mayday Poland
November 10
Spodek
Katowice, Poland


The twelfth edition of the Polish festival is a celebration of 20 years of rave history, two decades on from the original bash in Berlin which attracted 6,000 and started the Mayday rave movement on the continent. Mayday Twenty Young in Spodek is part of a series of festivals across Europe honouring the "mother of all raves" across this calendar year, from Holland to Russia. The Katowice one-dayer, which runs from 19:00 on Thursday 10th November through until 08:00 the next morning, goes for a through-the-ages style line-up. The German-heavy bill is headed by veterans Chris Liebing, Matthias Tanzmann, Tiefschwarz and Len Faki, and also includes Anthony Rother, Butch and Monika Kruse.

RA pick: Irrepressible honorary Berliner DJ Rush. 



Groove City

08. Groove City
November 26 
Brussels Kart
Brussels, Belgium


Groove City is a mainstay of Brussels' party calendar, and the fun returns this year to the inner city go-kart track that's served as its home for the last decade. The 11th edition of Groove City will again be divided into four well-defined musical sectors. House Blvd is likely to be the busiest thoroughfare, considering it's headlined by Fedde Le Grand's recent chart-topping achievements and the similarly infectious Calvin Harris. The Techno Highway will split the talent between German experts of the form, Chris Liebing and Ellen Allien, and a British double header of Ben Sims and James Holden. The space previously known as Drum & Bass Avenue has lost the drum and gained a broader definition of bass, adding Canadian brostep act Killawatts to this year's running order alongside drum & bass stalwarts Drumsound & Bassline Smith. The fourth arena has taken on a few incarnations over the years, and for this one it journeys down Electro Road, hosting the Midnight Munchies Room, featuring local lads Kill Frenzy, Le Petit Belge & Le Cheval.

RA pick: James Holden's outside-the-box take on techno. 



Le Guess Who?

07. Le Guess Who?
November 24 - November 27 
Various Venues 
Utrecht, Netherlands


If you're keen to tie a Dutch excursion to a festival but find the prospect of the ADE programme daunting, then Utrecht's Le Guess Who? might be just the ticket. The fifth edition of event provides the simple proposition of a three day, multi-venue venture in the nation's fourth largest city, set against the historic canal-side backdrop of Utrecht's city centre. A selection of indoor venues—Tivoli Oudegracht, Tivoli de Helling, EKKO, dBs, ACU, RASA—will support a base of Canadian acts (the festival was set-up as a platform for artists from the country) alongside…well, a bit of everything, really. Animal Collective's Panda Bear, John Maus, Zola Jesus and Swedish duo Roll the Dice all perform, while more exclusively electronic-based fare comes from Zomby, Com Truise, Slugabed and Pursuit Grooves. 

RA pick: After two standout recent full-lengths Roll the Dice should not be slept on. 



Stereosonic

06. Stereosonic
November 26 - December 4
Various Venues 
Various Cities, Australia

Sydney | Perth | Adelaide | Melbourne | Brisbane

Compared to most of Australia's annual summer music festivals, Stereosonic is a relative newcomer. Yet, in just a few years, it's established itself as one of the year's most popular events, mainly by playing host to an exceptionally mixed bag of acts (by Australian standards), ranging from the super-sized to the underground. Take a look at the 2011 bill for an idea: Carl Cox lines up alongside Gaslamp Killer, Annie Mac next to Deetron, Afrojack flanks Claude VonStroke. It's all set to kick off in Sydney on November 26th, after which the tour bus will stop in Perth, Adelaide, Melbourne and Brisbane for stadium-sized showings. 

RA pick: Peter Van Hoesen applying the techno pressure. 


I Love Techno

05. I Love Techno
November 12
Flanders Expo Centre 
Gent, Belgium


I Love Techno returns with a menu of techno, electro and dubstep in its sixteenth year. The 35,000 capacity indoor festival has become one of the biggest names in electronic music since it hosted just 700 fans in its inaugural year of 1995 and its line-up yet again is testament to this progress, albeit away from its titular genre. German techno favourite Paul Kalkbrenner heads the bill alongside countrymen Boyz Noize, Len Faki and Digitalism; and scene legends Carl Craig (as 69) and Laurent Garnier (as LBS) line up in the Red Room. British dubsteppers Skream and Benga will bring the bass, while France's Brodinski and Cassius will provide their take on electro. 

RA pick: Agoria's Red Room performance should be one of the more leftfield offerings of the evening. 



STRP Festival

04. STRP Festival
November 18 - November 27 
Klokgebouw
Eindhoven, Netherlands


A sort of indie/electro pulse drove the 2010 edition of STRP Festival. And for 2011? We think techno/experimental would be the best way of putting it. (With names like Chris Liebing & Speedy J, Michael Mayer, Len Faki, James Holden, Mathew Jonson, DVS1, Aphex Twin, Amon Tobin and Rustie making up the bill we're not sure any other conclusion can be drawn.) The main musical portions of the event bookend ten days of art, film, live cinema, performances, interviews, lectures, gaming and robotics out of Eindhoven's Strijp-S, which in former years housed part of electronics manufacturer Philips' global operation. This year also features something the organisers are calling STRP EXPO, which will "present highlights in Dutch media art from the past 50 years."

RA pick: Amon Tobin's ISAM rig in full effect. 



La Petite Invites: Nuits Sonores

03. La Petite Invites: Nuits Sonores
November 3 - November 6 
Various Venues 
Toulouse, France


The slimmed-down version of Lyon's annual Nuits Sonores festival, hosted by arts outfit La Petite, makes its return to Toulouse this year, offering an exclusively indoor take on the main event's multi-venue, multi-day format. Forgive us for skipping straight to the final act, but the press surrounding the festival appears at pains to point out the potential magic in Chilly Gonzalès & His Quintet's performance at the Halle aux Grains theatre (they may have apoint). Elsewhere across the four days, Richard Fearless' recently revived Death In Vegas play the inaugural evening; Caribou, M.A.N.D.Y. and Pilooski play the same venue—Le Bikini—the next night; and Hudson Mohawke, Dusty Kid, Panteros 666 and Renart show their wares at Opéra Bouffe. 

RA pick: The aforementioned Chilly Gonzalès finale feels like the must-do event. 



Fly Bermuda

02. Fly Bermuda
November 5
Tempelhof Airport
Berlin, Germany


As big as Berlin's club scene is, it's also compartmentalized: small-to-medium clubs are the norm, and festival-size events are few and far between. That's what's great about enormous parties like FLY Bermuda—you get the booking style of the city's clubs, but the variety and magnitude of a summer festival. When else could you see dOP and Sven Vath under the same roof? And where else in the German capital could you see something like Plastikman's live show, which demands a venue of considerable scale? After a week of bouncing around from venue-to-venue at the BerMuDa conference, it'll be good for everyone to have the opportunity to be in the same place at the same time—especially if that place is a gigantic disused airport.

RA pick: He's down near the bottom of the bill but don't overlook George FitzGerald's skewed take on house and garage. 



Club to Club

01. Club to Club
November 3 - November 6
Various Venues
Turin, Italy


Torino's Club to Club is the jewel of the Piemonte region's arts festival crown, but this year it draws inspiration from a rich national history—specifically Italy's 150th anniversary of unification—to look to the future, with an "Italian New Wave" theme that gives special attention to up-and-coming homegrown talent. While the names and vital stats of this year's featured Italian artists will be revealed with further lineup announcements, a cast of international acts is rapidly plugging the gaps. Young guns Kyle Hall and Space Dimension Controller will head to Milan for the Viva show, there will be a further warmup in Rome, and the main action will go down in Torino where techno, house, bass, experimental and other odds-and-ends will be covered by Lone, Marcel Dettmann, Jackmaster, Deniz Kurtel, Theo Parrish, Hype Williams and Jeff Mills reprising his show-stopping performance from 2009. A set of wheels is essential to getting the most out of the festival's widespread range of venues, ferrying you between the dizzying number of theatres, clubs, temporary spaces, bars, museums and other unexpected cultural spots.

ВАШ ВЫБОР

1 ▲
9 October 2011 15:14
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Крайне оригинальная ветвь диджеинга!!!

Dub FX Gets Creative with Traktor Kontrol 

рот а не ест)))

4 ▲
9 June 2011 23:06
13 comments